Follow Simon Caulkin on Twitter



Article Archive
2019
May
April
March
February
January
2018
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2014
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2013
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2012
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2011
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2010
December
October
September
2009
November
October
June
May
April
March
February
January
2008
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2007
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2006
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2005
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2004
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2003
December
November
1998
January
1997
January
1996
February
1994
May


The art of leadership

Mon, 28th Jan 2013

Read my article on managment as a liberal art, FT Business Education, 28 January 2013, here


<< Back to Index

User comments

Henning Sieverts :: 28th Jan 13
It could be borne in mind that when Peter Drucker made reference to a liberal arts education, he was specifically addressing the US model of higher education, in which most universities and colleges have long had the goal of producing "well rounded" graduates who have spent their four undergraduate years taking courses in the liberal arts as well as in more vocationally or professionally oriented coursework. Disciplines such as medicine, the law, engineering, typically enter young people's lives at the graduate school level (ca age 22), which is not the British and European model. Hence when Drucker spoke of the preparatory years of a professional manager's career, his reference to the liberal arts would have been familiar to most educated Americans, especially those that went to elite universities and colleges. It is not a fluke that graduate programmes in the US, in medicine, the natural sciences, and so on, to this day attract students whose undergraduate majors were in fields such as classics, music, hi
Henning Sieverts :: 28th Jan 13
[there seems to be a length limit.] ...history, and so on. This is the norm and not the exception. Drucker was a rarity in his day and now, in his broadening the focus of business management theory and studies to encompass the voluntary and nonprofit sectors, especially in health care. He wrote with clarity that an organisation whose goals were to meet the community's health care needs must not fall into the trap of setting commercial objectives as if it were a company with shareholders. He was enormously influential in my generation of health care managers and planners, from the 60s to the end of the century. His "management by objectives" was not a slogan; it was a complex worked-out system of governance and management.
Name:
Comment:
Check:8+4=