Follow Simon Caulkin on Twitter



Article Archive
2017
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2014
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2013
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2012
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2011
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2010
December
October
September
2009
November
October
June
May
April
March
February
January
2008
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2007
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2006
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2005
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2004
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2003
December
November
1998
January
1997
January
1996
February
1994
May


Staying alive

Wed, 30th Sep 2015

 Read my blog 'Staying alive' for Drucker Society Europe here


<< Back to Index

User comments

Henning Sieverts :: 30th Sep 15
I find this piece very puzzling. It seems to assume that people spend all of their waking hours at work, and that most people who work are or soon will be in systems that de-humanise in the ways that Simon describes so vividly.* Isn't the reality that for most workers, especially in the service industries, the demands aren't paricularly different than they were twenty and forty years ago? And that for most workers, much of the focus of their daily lives is external to the tasks of work? Even Amazon and Walmart warehouse slaves spend many minutes per shift bullshitting and confiding to workmates -- and after work, they have families, friends, hobbies, meals, games, and much more that gives variety and humanness to their lives. Yeah, for many (but still a minority, certainly), the workplace is a bummer, but is that different from before modern IT? *Simon quotes a Brian Arthur, describing him as a "complexity scientist". What in the world is that?
Name:
Comment:
Check:5+8=