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Variety is the spice of the 100-year life

Fri, 5th Aug 2016

 Read my London Business School Review article on Andrew Scott and Lynda Gratton's 'The 100-year life' here


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User comments

Henning Sieverts :: 13th Aug 16
It matters not whether the authors' projections turn out to be precisely right, because the process of societal ageing is very much under way. A growing proportion of people already reach their 80s, 90s, and 100s. And a growing proportion are in pretty good shape, and are facing exactly the challenges that Simon's review describes.
Henning Sieverts :: 13th Aug 16
Clearly, we have to deal with the fact that retiring at 60 or 65, for those sound in body and mind, is nonsensical, and that holds true across the whole of the culture. Not only is prolonged earning vital, but people need things to do if they are going to live satisfactorily. That's so for the "working class" as much as it is for people in the professions, in business, the arts, and academia.
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