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Inclusive growth and prosperity for whom?

Mon, 12th Jun 2017

 Read my article in EFMD Global Focus, June 2017, here


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User comments

Henning Sieverts :: 13th Jun 17
This is a superb essay; I hope it gets a much wider readership than the quite narrow audience to which it is directed. That said, it would have been good if Simon had addressed an issue which had traction in the odd campaign and election that we have just experienced, namely "social care". Our PM and her party see this primarily as a cost challenge: finding the money to support a rapidly increasing level of demand. It can better be seen as an opportunity for innovative strategic and programmatic planning, creating good and rewarding jobs for well-trained and well-motivated workers. Social care is a social good much as clean air, energy conservation, and low-carbon are. The same can be said for health care: again, the government sees this fundamentally as a cost burden which needs to be managed, rather than a vital human service which has the potential not only for more effective management of efficiency and efficacy, but as an opportunity for the development of the decently paid and personally reward
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