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Business schools are in thrall to economics

Mon, 27th Jan 2014

Read my article on why it's time to break management's cringe to economics in FT Business Education, 27 January 2014, here


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User comments

Henning Sieverts :: 27th Jan 14
Simon, one of your best! My knowledge of American graduate schools of business goes back to the 1960s and the following three decades, mainly with the Harvard Business School and the Wharton School. As a hospital CEO and later a senior executive in not-for-profit health plans, I had temporary custody of multiple MBA candidates, and I lectured and ran seminars as well. I even came in second in the competition to be a tenured prof at Harvard, a piece of excellent good luck. I taught and interacted with a lot of very bright men and women, not one of whom I recall as having any kind of useful professional preparation and knowledge, at least with respect to health care management. What they knew was a great deal of theory which had little relevance to the actual challenges of the field. Actually, in the earlier phase, they also didn't know much about economics, or even accounting. Their speciality was meant to be in health care management; the sad truth was that when they came for a residency, they nearly a
Henning Sieverts :: 27th Jan 14
(continuation) always knew nothing at all about medical care, the dynamics (and values) of health care organisations, and the relationships between such organisations and their communities. What they knew was management theory, and about adding commercial value, one supposes. Unlike in the recent past, they were ignorant about economics, accounting, and financial management. Over time, of course, as they ascended the career ladder, they caused great damage to American health care.
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